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July 12, 2022

Key of Gb Major Harmonic Workout

This JazzPianoSkills Podcast Episode explores a Key of Gb Major Harmonic Workout (Block Chords, Traditional and Contemporary Shells, Two-Handed Voicings) + Rhythmic Comping Patterns


Welcome to JazzPianoSkills; it's time to discover, learn, and play Jazz Piano!

Every JazzPianoSkills weekly podcast episode introduces aspiring jazz pianists to essential Jazz Piano Skills. Each Podcast episode explores a specific Jazz Piano Skill in depth. Today you will discover, learn, and play a Key of Gb Major Melodic Workout. In this Jazz Piano Lesson, you will:

Discover
A Key of Gb Major Harmonic Workout

Learn
How to "think" within the Key of Gb Major, Harmonically

Play
Block Chords, Traditional and Contemporary Shells, Two-Handed Voicings using common harmonic motion AND various Rhythmic Comping Patterns

For maximum musical growth, use the Jazz Piano Podcast Packets for this Jazz Piano Lesson. All three Podcast Packets are designed to help you gain insight and command of a specific Jazz Piano Skill. The Podcast Packets are invaluable educational tools to have at your fingertips while doing a Key of Gb Major Harmonic Workout.

Open Podcast Packets
Illustrations
(detailed graphics of the jazz piano skill)
Lead Sheets
(beautifully notated music lead sheets)
Play Alongs
(ensemble assistance and practice tips)

Educational Support
Community Forum
SpeakPipe

Episode Outline
Introduction
Discover, Learn, Play
Invite to Join JazzPianoSkills
Rationale
Exploration of Jazz Piano Skills
Conclusion
Closing Comments

Visit JazzPianoSkills for more educational resources, including a sequential curriculum with interactive Jazz Piano Courses, private and group online Jazz Piano Classes, and a private jazz piano community, Jazz Piano Forums.

If you wish to support JazzPianoSkills with a donation, you can do so easily through the JazzPianoSkills Paypal Account.

Thank you for being a JazzPianoSkills listener. I am pleased to help you discover, learn, and play jazz piano!

Warm Regards,
Dr. Bob Lawrence
President, The Dallas School of Music
JazzPianoSkills

AMDG

Transcript

Dr. Bob Lawrence  0:32  
Welcome to jazz piano skills. I'm Dr. Bob Lawrence, it's time to discover, learn and play jazz piano. Today, you are going to discover a key of G flat major harmonic workout. Let me say that again, key of G flat major harmonic workout. And you're going to learn how to think within the key of G flat major harmonically. And you're gonna play essential jazz piano voicings block chords, traditional contemporary shells, as well as two handed shapes, all all of them using common harmonic motion and on top of all that, explore various rhythmic comping patterns focusing on the quarter note, triplet, the quarter note, triplet. So as I always like to say, regardless of where you are in your jazz journey, a beginner an intermediate player, an advanced player, or even if you consider yourself a seasoned and experienced professional, and you're gonna find this jazz panel skills podcast lesson exploring a key of G flat major harmonic workout to be very beneficial. But before we get started, if you are new to the jazz piano skills podcast if you are new to jazz piano skills, I want to as I always do at the beginning of every podcast episode, I want to welcome you and personally invite you to become a jazz piano skills member. All you have to do to join, visit jazz panel skills.com And once you arrive at the homepage, you can begin to explore you can begin to poke around and discover all the abundance of jazz educational resources, materials and services that are available for you to use. To help you significantly improve your jazz panel skills. For example, the educational podcast packets, the illustrations, the lead sheets and the player locks that I developed I produce for every weekly podcast episode. These are invaluable educational tools that you want to have in your hands as you listen to this podcast episode and you certainly want to have sitting on your piano as you are practicing as well. As a jazz piano skills member you have access to the sequential online jazz piano curriculum which is loaded, loaded with comprehensive code courses, all of them all of them using a self paced format. There are educational talks, interactive media, video demonstrations in all 12 keys so the skill that is being taught plus play alongs and much much more. You also as a jazz panel skills member have a reserved seat in the online weekly master classes which are in essence one hour online lessons with me each and every week. You also the list continues on that you also as a jazz piano skills member have access to the online interactive Fakebook, which grants you access to jazz standards from the Great American Songbook. Once you have access to the Fakebook you can begin enjoying chord changes lead sheets there are harmonic functionally sheets, play long files, historical insights, inspirational recordings, and much more. It's an ever growing collection of tunes that you should absolutely discover learn in play. You also as a jazz panel skills member have access to the online private jazz piano skills community, which hosts a variety of engaging forums there are podcasts specific forums, course specific forums. And of course, there are general jazz piano forums for you to enjoy as well. You have access to all of the forums and you will have the ability to contribute to them as well. Right, which I encourage you to do, share, engage and grow. And last but not least, you have access to unlimited private, personal and professional educational support provided by me whenever and as often as you need it. So visit jazz panel skills.com Check it out. Learn more about all of these wonderful educational opportunities that are awaiting you and how to easily activate your membership now There are several membership plans to choose from. And I am certain there is one that is perfect for you. But nevertheless, if you get there and you're poking around, you have some questions regarding the membership plans, please do not hesitate to reach out to me, let me know I'm always happy to spend some time with you, and answer any questions that you may have. Okay, let's discover, learn and play jazz piano let's discover, learn and play a key of G flat major harmonic workout.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  5:33  
All right, as you regular listeners know, I go through this little routine every time we begin our exploration of a new key. And of course, I'm going to go through it again right now. And I do so because I love doing it. It's fun. So are you ready, I want to encourage you to say it along with me. Okay, here we go. The key of C major is over the Q F major over key a B flat major, long gone. It's over key of E flat major over key of A flat major over and now the key of D flat major is over. Now, I don't know about you, but I always feel good about moving on. Even if I no I do not have a complete handle on the skills that I've been currently working on. As I have said many times throughout this journey, it's a big deal. It's a really big deal to keep forging ahead, no matter what, no matter how well. You think you have mastered, or have not mastered the essential jazz piano skills in previous keys, or how shaky you may believe your jazz piano skills are in previous keys. So irrelevant. We must always be moving forward. Forward motion without question is the key to developing our jazz piano skills and becoming an accomplished jazz pianist. I mentioned this point last month and I want to bring it to your attention. Once again. If you are truly serious, which I know you are, if you are truly serious about wanting to improve your jazz piano playing, again, which I know you are, then your goal should be to experience as much data as possible. In other words, you have to have a plan in place that allows you to cycle through essential jazz piano skills. In all 12 keys, your jazz journey must always be experiencing forward motion. Right. As I like to say you cannot allow grass to grow under your feet. You've heard me say this a gazillion times before as well. The number one reason why people find it difficult to improve their Jazz Piano playing is that they always practice the same things. Right always. Not only do they practice the same things, they practice the same things in the same keys over and over and over and over again. And so in essence that right there just simply running in place. They they never push forward. They never move through the keys as we have set out to do since the beginning of this year. 2020 To 12 months 12 keys right essential jazz piano skills in all 12 keys voicing scales, arpeggios chord scale relationships, improvisation rhythms. Wow. Such a good plan. Such a good approach. And quite honestly such a great timeframe 12 months. So today, we begin tackling the key of key flat major, we're over halfway there. So as I have stressed over and over again, once we move on, we move on right in other words, we do not try to sneak back. We don't try to sneak back to the previous keys in the wee small hours of the morning. Of course without anyone looking to simply check out how well we remember the voicings or the scales or the arpeggios in that particular key right it's time to move on so we literally move on. The books on the key of D flat major

Dr. Bob Lawrence  9:52  
are closed and on to the key of G flat major we go wow and As we have done with the previous keys we have explored this year C F, B flat, E flat, A flat and D flat. We begin harmonically always harmonically, we are going to explore the seven chords of the key of G flat major, which are G flat major seven, E flat minor seven, B flat minor seven, C flat major seven, D flat dominant seven, E flat minor seven, and F minor seven, flat five or F half diminished. Right, we're going to explore each one of those chords using four specific approaches to voicing, right, we're going to use traditional blocks, traditional shells, contemporary shells, and of course, two handed shapes. We will then as we did in the Keys have F B flat, E flat, A flat and D flat, apply those voicings to various rhythmic copying patterns, which, as you know, the regular listeners know become increasingly more and more challenging each month. And I want to remind you that you can take the various rhythmic patterns that we studied and the keys of F, B flat, E flat, A flat and D flat and play them using the voicings we are about to to get under our fingers for the key of G flat as well. Right, you can remove these patterns continue to move the patterns forward. That's not only okay, but it is a great idea. And you should absolutely absolutely be carrying these various rhythmic comping patterns forward throughout the year as we move through all 12 keys. Now, a couple of weeks ago, I talked about improvisational vocabulary. And I want to revisit my thoughts today because honestly, we need to hear it again. I say that because as an experienced educator, as an experienced teacher, I have come to realize that it takes repeating a point many times before the student, actually, here's it. So that's what I'm going to do today I'm going to repeat my thoughts on improvisational vocabulary. So, here we go. When we we being jazz educators, when we talk about developing improvisational vocabulary, and whenever this topic comes up, it is always discussed from a melodic point of view. In other words, the expression improvisation vocabulary has become synonymous with melodic playing, which is, which is only a third of the entire picture. In addition to placing emphasis on melodic development, we need to spend time discussing and focusing on harmonic development and rhythmic development when the topic of improvisation vocabulary as mentioned. And that is precisely what all of the harmonic workouts are all about. They're all about harmonic and rhythmic development. So when studying a solo melodic transcription, we do so if we do it correctly, we do so in such a way, that the ideas and the approaches to melodic development displayed by the artist. They serve as a launching pad or gateway to discovery of our own melodic creativity. You know, as I said a couple of weeks ago, we don't study a Bill Evans transcription and hopes of becoming an inferior replica of Bill Evans, because that's exactly what we would do if we're just simply trying to copy him, we'd end up just becoming an inferior replica of Bill Evans. We study a Bill Evans transcription so that Bill Evans can serve as our educator our teacher, Bill Evans, can't introduce us to our own creative reservoir.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  14:14  
If you have not given time to think about this, then I strongly encourage you to do so. And think about this as well. When when we focus on harmonic development voicings and rhythmic development time, we should be doing so in the spirit of discovering our very own and unique form of musical expression. And again, this is this is exactly what all of these harmonic and quite honestly melodic workouts are all about. The voicings I share with you are to help you discover the sound the harmony that you are drawn to. And the rhythms I introduce are done so to help you develop a stronger internal sense I have what I like to call expressive time. And what I mean by that, that phrase expressive time, time is just time. unless we do something rhythmically within that time. There's nothing expressive about it. Think about it. This is, this is certainly a lot to process and digest. And that's why I wanted to come back to this topic again today and just revisit it for a moment. So think about it. And of course, if you have any questions with regards to anything that I just mentioned, as always, please let me know I'm always happy to help you in any way that I possibly can. So today, we tackle the key of G flat major in the educational agenda for today is as follows number one, we begin our key of G flat major harmonic workout for the month of July. And we are going to play number two we are going to play essential harmonic voicings that you need to discover learn and play block shapes, traditional shells, contemporary shells and two handed shapes in the key of G flat major. Number three, we're going to utilize a temple of 85 today for all musical examples at five. Number four, we're going to explore 12. comping rhythms focusing on the quarter note, triplet last month, it was the eighth note triplet today, the quarter note triplet. And number five, we are going to apply our rhythmic comping patterns of course, as we always do, to the classic 251 progression in the key of G flat major. So now if you are a jazz piano skills member, I want you to hit the pause button take a few minutes right now to download and print your podcast packets. The illustrations lead sheets in the play Hwang's again, your membership grants you access to all the educational podcast packets for every weekly podcast episode. And as I mentioned earlier, you should be using these when listening to this podcast episode. And you certainly should be using them. Have them saved on your piano as you are practicing. Okay, and if you're listening to this podcast on any of the popular podcast directories such as Google or Amazon, Apple, Spotify, Pandora, iHeartRadio, and so on, then be sure to go directly to the jazz piano skills podcast website. And that's jazz piano skills podcast.com to access and download your podcast packets, and you will find the act of download links within the show notes. And one final but extremely important note that I mentioned each and every week. That if you're thinking in some way, shape, or form that the key of G flat major harmonic workout, various skills that we're about to discover, learn and play are over your head, then all I have to say to you is stop it. Just stop. No worries, sit back, relax, continue to listen, and continue to grow your jazz piano skills intellectually by listening. Right? Listen, every new skill, every new skill is technically over our heads when first introduced. But this is exactly why the very first step in getting better toward improving our musicianship, the very first step is always just to simply listen. So what do we do we place ourselves smack dab in the middle of conversations where we are hearing things that we've never heard before. And we are forced to grow intellectually. You know, I've said this a gazillion times, right? All musical growth begins upstairs conceptually mentally, before it can come out downstairs physically in your hands. So with that being said, sit back, listen to this podcast. Listen now to discover and learn. The play as it always does, will come in time, I guarantee it. Okay, now that you have your podcast packets in front of you, I want you to grab the lead sheets and the very first thing I want to address is the very last page of your lead sheets packets. It's labeled skill 17. But the title of the page is combien rhythms. Now you will notice there are 12 rhythmic patterns labeled letter A through letter L. And you will also notice that these rhythmic patterns focus primarily on the quarter note triplet triplet, you can actually visually see it right as you just sit there and you look at the lychee you can visually see all of these A quarter note triplets, you will also notice that each of these rhythmic patterns is to be played with the 251 progression, which is exactly what we are going to do today. Now, do not bypass practicing skills one through 16. Obviously, I do not have time in this episode to walk through each of those skills one through 16 right now.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  20:27  
So, I did that back in the very first episode of the year when we dealt with the harmonic workout in the key of C major. But since then, each one of the podcast episodes focuses on the rhythmic patterns in addition to those skills, right that we use those skills to to play these rhythmic patterns. So all four voicings types, your blocks, your traditional shells, your contemporary shells, and your two handed voicings should be practice first without rhythm as illustrated in the lead sheets. And, and, and get a mastery of those or I shouldn't say mastery, comfort with those before tackling skill 17. I also want to stress the importance to use the play alongside included in your podcast packets, right. Obviously, I do not have time in this podcast episode to play like I just mentioned earlier all through through all 16 exercises, but the play alongs are there to help you do exactly that. Okay, so don't get the cart ahead of the horse. practice scales one through 16 to make sure you have a handle on each of the four voicing types. as applied to the chords found in the key of G flat major right G flat major seven, A flat minor seven, B flat minor seven, C flat major seven D flat dominant seven, E flat minor, seven and F half diminished, then, then turn your attention to developing your copying scales, using the voicings as you play the 251 progression in the key of G flat major, A flat minor seven to D flat dominant seven resolving to G flat major seven. Okay, let's dig in, grab that lead sheet 17 skill 17 Copying rhythms. Again, 251 progression for all 12 rhythms letter A through letter L. Okay. Now, I'm going to play each one of these rhythmic lines I'm going to play through first I'm going to play just the 251 progression on the front end and the back end just straight, nothing fancy. I'm just going to play the two chord the five chord the one chord so you so you get acclimated to the sound to the progression we get it into our ears right then I'm going to play each rhythmic line four times, I'm gonna repeat it four times, you can choose to use any of the voicing types that you want. When practicing these at home you can use the block shapes for the traditional shells, contemporary shells or the two handed shapes. Today I'm going to be using the two handed voicings for all rhythmic lines letter A through letter L. The fact you don't even need to use a voice and quite honestly, you can use a single note to begin internalizing these rhythmic patterns. And then once you are comfortable with the pattern, then you can move to a voicing if once you're comfortable, right. So okay, so let's look at line letter A. Right away you're seeing that there's quarter note triplets. On counts two and three. I'm sorry, quarter note triplets on counts three and four. Of measure one, measure two and measure three quarter note triplets are extended over two entire beats of the measure. The eighth note triplet that we looked at, in the key of D flat, eighth note triplets are expand expand over one beat. In the measure. quarter note triplets expand over two beats. So when letter A you see the half note followed by a quarter note triplet. So the half note counts one and two, the quarter note triplet counts three and four. And again this happens on measure one measure to measure three just to get us into this this rhythmic idea of the quarter note triplet. So let's bring the ensemble in let's take a listen to this. And check it out and see what we think again 251 up front before I start playing the rhythm. Here we go check it out.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  26:07  
Pretty cool, right? Spend some time with letter eight seriously before you move on to letter B, C, D, and so on, get a feel for the quarter note triplet and playing that extended over two beats. It's a huge deal. It's a very huge deal. So the more time you spend with letter A, the easier B through our will become. So now let's take a look at letter B and you'll see why right. So we start the same way half note followed by quarter note triplet on counts three and four. Measure two on the five chord half note followed by a quarter rest followed by an eighth note triplet, and then in measure three back to the half note followed by a quarter note triplet. So the idea here is getting you comfortable playing quarter note triplet, eighth note triplet, back to quarter note, triplet. Okay, tricky. So let's bring the ensemble in. Let's check it out. See what we think here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  28:20  
Not that easy, right. Right. It's not that easy to seamlessly flow in and out of quarter note triplets, the eighth note triplets back the quarter note triplets. So, yeah, it's kind of mean throw that at you right away and let her be but we had to get that out of the way. And we're gonna have to deal with that more as we go. Letter three letter C through, letter out. So Alright, so let's take a look at letter C. We have now a quarter note triplet on counts one and two, followed by a pair of eighth notes, check out check out five. I mean, check out the to measure with the five chord right? Check it out. There's nothing there. And it's always amazing to me how difficult it is for us to learn how to play nothing to learn how to play space, to learn how to play silence, and while doing so, maintain and continue to track time. So measure to even though it's a whole rest may be trickier and more challenging than you may initially think. Then we come in on Measure three with the one chord we have our quarter note triplets again a triplet happening on counts one and two, followed by our eighth a pair of eighth notes on count three. And then what silence on measure four. So okay, wow, let's let's give this a spin. See what we think. Here we go. Check it out.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  30:00  
Hey. See what I mean, it's always more challenging. I don't know what it is right piano players we love to fill up space, we just love to fill up space. And it's so very difficult for us to sit still and to do nothing. So, if you found that to be challenging, just know that you are not alone you are in, you're in a boat with many, many others, my friend many, many others. So okay, letter D. Now it gets a little bit more involved doesn't it, you can just visually see that we have our classic eight, quarter eight rhythm on counts one and two followed by a quarter note triplet on three counts three and four, followed by a pair of eighth notes in measure to measure three, check it out, we have a dotted quarter rhythm tied to a quarter, right and another quarter and then followed up with another quarter note triplet in measure four Wow, tricky, got a count kind of feel these rhythmic patterns. So let's bring the ensemble in. And let's take a close listen to letter D. Again, two measures one, four measures up front which is playing the 251 progression before I start playing the rhythm. So here we go check it out.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  33:40  
Love it right every one of these rhythms presents another twist and turn that you have to deal with and letter E is certainly no exception. Check this out. This is challenging here right letter E we have eighth note triplets on counts one and three and measure one on the two chord then followed by a quarter note triplet with the five chord going back to eighth note triplets over the one chord on counts one and three. And then followed by a pair of eighth notes that just sit out there on count three and measure four. So Wow. Challenging no doubt here we have to deal with this being able to seamlessly flowing in and out of our eighth note triplets and our quarter note triplet. So here we go. Might as well tackle it. So let's bring the ensemble in and let's take a listen and see what we think here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  35:41  
Again, right, it's always challenging to flow in and out of eighth note triplets to quarter note triplets or quarter note triplets into eighth note triplets. But once the feel locks in for you, it's there for good. I promise you so time and effort spent wrestling with these eighth note and quarter note triplets is time well spent. Okay, so now let's check out letter F. letter F forces us to deal with dotted quarter eighth rhythms and measure one measure to right on counts one and two, followed by quarter note triplets on three and four and both measures one and 210. We have the eighth dotted quarter rhythm tied to a half note followed up with a quarter note triplet. So yeah, every one of these every one of these rhythmic patterns offer a new twist and a new challenge rhythmically for sure. So let's bring the ensemble and let's check out letter F then see what we think here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  37:58  
Wow, lots going on right dotted quarter eighths, eighths, dotted quarters, quarter note triplets. It's not easy. And letter G when you think it's going to get a little easier really, we're back to this challenge again of being able to differentiate easily between eighth note triplets and quarter note triplets so you can see there we have eighth note triplets and measure one followed by quarter note triplets and measure triplet and measure two followed by an eighth note triplet in measure three followed by a measure of silence which we've already discovered is not necessarily easy to play. So okay, let's bring the ensemble in let's check out lethargy have a little fun here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  39:56  
Nice bye now we're starting to get a nice understanding Need a nice feel for the eighth note triplet versus the quarter note triplet. So with that being said check out letter eight, we put quarter note triplets back to back. And not only once but we do it twice. So measure one we have quarter note triplet on counts three and four followed by quarter note triplet on count one and two of measure two. Then in measure three we have quarter note triplet on counts three and four followed by quarter note triplet on counts one and two and measure four. So now we had the quarter note triplet, but now we have them back to back so let's bring the ensemble and let's check out letter H. This should be a lot of fun. So here we go check it out.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  42:01  
Pretty cool, right? Pretty cool. You know just when you think I can't get any more challenging, you know putting quarter note triplets back to back. I got news for you, I want you to check out let her i and I'm not. I'm not being very nice here right I'm, I'm actually putting these quarter note triplets. In measure one, measure two and measure three and put in a quarter note triplet. Literally on count counts two and three. So I'm literally having you play over that imaginary bar line that we have discussed in masterclasses and in in previous podcast episodes, so it's a little tricky, right visually, it's tricky because you can't easily you can't easily Visually divide the bar line, I mean divide the measure in half with counts one and two being on one side and three and four being on the other side. Because I put those quarter note triplets right there smack dab in the middle of the measure spanning counts two and three but did that intentionally because I want to I want you to practice these quarter note triplets and been able to play them and be able to track time easily as well. And this is a challenge right because you have a rest on count four and you have a rest on count one like a measure you have and measure one you have a restaurant count for measure two you have a restaurant count one and then you come back and what that quarter note triplet, and then you do the same thing between measure two and measure three so there's a little bit of challenge here I did it on purpose. I apologize but believe me it's four it's like broccoli right? It's good for you. This is good for you. So let's bring the ensemble and let's check it out and see what we think here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  44:54  
See I told you it's good for you. Just remember that it's good for you. So continue to work on letter I a lot. All right, letter J. Now this, this is tricky to write, we finally have some eighth notes that are falling on the backside of the beat. So we have a single eighth note on the backside account two followed with a quarter note triplet on counts three and four. We do that in measure one we do that and measure two we do that and measure three followed by a pair of eighth notes and a quarter note and measure for some Yeah, I'm sorry, it's not getting it's not a whole lot easier, right? But again, it's good for it. So here we go. letter J, let's bring the ensemble and let's check this out.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  46:51  
Yep, eighth notes that always fall on the backside of a beat challenging and then then what the heck you following up with a quarter note triplet? It's just not. It's not right, isn't it? It's not right. But man, it's in music. It's there. I mean, I hear it. We play at jazz musicians play it. So okay, letter K. Sorry, not getting a whole lot better. Right. Now we have our quarter note triplet on counts one and two followed by an eighth quarter eighth combination that goes right into a quarter note triplet on counts one and two of measure two followed by what, eighth quarter eighth combination. Going into measure three pair of eighth notes on counts will count one and pair of eighth notes on count three. And then wrapped up in count four with a eighth quarter eighth rhythm. Wow. I'm telling you, hey, but you know what the good news is this, you get comfortable with eighth notes, pair of eighth notes, single eighth notes, eighth notes on the downbeat eighth notes on the backside of a beat, eighth note triplets, quarter note triplets you get used to these rhythms. You're going to be a heck one heck of a jazz musician, I promise. Okay, these patterns and these rhythms are laced throughout the jazz literature. All right, so let's bring the ensemble in and let's check out letter k here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  49:23  
Wow, wow, it has been a through it A through K has been quite a quite a journey right but we're not done. Our last one is yet to come letter L and check. Check this out. How fun is this? Quarter note triplet on 123 and four counts one and two and three and four and measure what back to back again right and then look at five quarter note triplet on one and two quarter note triplet on three and four again back to back. So in essence what we have are quarter note triplets back to back to back to back followed by a pair of eighth notes, followed by some silence and then wrapped up with another quarter note triplet. Wow, the grand finale right it's like the it's like the fireworks at the end of the grand finale on the fireworks at the end of fourth of July, what a what a way to wrap up our coordinate triplet explorations. So let's bring the ensemble Lin letter L, let's check it out and see what we think here we go.

Dr. Bob Lawrence  51:37  
Well, I'm exhausted, we've done it again. As always, right? We've unpacked an amazing amount of information in one very short, in one very fast hour, right. So do not underestimate the importance of these rhythmic patterns, being able to play these patterns in time, right and being able to do so using voicings right be always be honest with yourself. If you if you are having a challenge with these comping patterns, right, then, like I said, it's not a problem to go back to the patterns that we explored back in February in the key of F or in the key of B flat, some of those early exercises, rhythmic exercises, because quite honestly, that's where it all begins those fundamental whole note half note, quarter note rhythms, you get those a mastery of those and then able to start layering in the eighth note rhythms that we've been exploring in the key of D flat now, in the key of G flat, you are going to be good to go. I promise, right. And in fact, rhythm of patterns that we use these rhythmic patterns, to play our voicings, really in essence, all of this is to help us develop to develop our time to be able to track and feel time, right so often. So often students struggle with playing jazz, it's because of their inability to successfully track time. And that's what these rhythmic patterns help us do. Right. In other words, being able to always know where count one is, or where count to count three, count four and not to guess. All right. The reality is, if you're guessing that rhythms, you, I'm telling you, you have a greater chance at winning the lottery than you do at guessing that rhythms and being able to play them correctly, and to be able to play them correctly in time. Now, next week, we are going to jump into our key of G flat major melodic workout. And of course, I will introduce some of the rhythmic twist, especially these quarter note triplets in that work out as well. So as I had been stressing every month, hang in there, hang in there with me this year. And you're going to experience a ton of jazz piano growth you will love where you are musically a year from now I guarantee it, you'll feel the difference. And most importantly, you're going to hear the difference in your playing by the end of the year. Right. Once again, I want to encourage you, especially all you jazz piano skills members, I want to encourage you to use those podcast packets, the illustrations, the lead sheets to play alongs to guide you as you study and practice and these, again, these are educational tools that will help you gain a mastery of the jazz piano skills conceptually, physically and of course, musically. And one last little note as always Be patient, right developing mature professional jazz piano skills takes time. But begin structuring your practicing after the demonstrations that I modeled for you today in this podcast episode. And you will begin to feel you will begin to see it you'll begin to hear your progress. I guarantee it Well I hope you found this jazz panel skills podcast lesson exploring the key of G flat major harmonic workout to be exciting, right? I do I hope you found it to be exciting, insightful and of course I hope you find it to be beneficial don't forget if you are a jazz panel skills ensemble member I will see you online Thursday evening at the jazz piano skills masterclass at 8pm Central time to discuss this podcast episode lesson exploring a key of G flat major harmonic workout in greater detail. And of course to answer any questions that you may have about the study of jazz in general. Be sure to use the educational podcast packets, the illustrations, the lead sheets, the play alongs for this podcast lesson, and also check out the jazz panel skills courses. They will maximize your musical growth and also make sure you are an active participant in the jazz piano skills community. Get out there, get involved, contribute to the various forums, introduce yourself, make some new jazz piano friends, always a great thing to do. You can reach me as always by phone 972-380-8050 My office extension here at the Dallas School of Music is 211 You can reach me by email Dr. Lawrence at jazz piano skills.com

Dr. Bob Lawrence  56:24  
That's Dr. Lawrence at jazz Powell skills.com Or you can use the nifty little SpeakPipe widget that is found throughout the jazz piano skills website. The contact me while there is my cue. That's it for now. And until next week, enjoy the key A G flat major harmonic workout. And most of all, have fun as you discover, learn and play jazz piano